Lesson Plans King Henry IV, Part I

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Each plan contains the following components:. He also understood that we often adopt disguises—with or without the benefit of costumes—to help us negotiate the relationships and obstacles that we encounter along the way. In-class performance and discussion build on episode clips. Learning Objectives of the lesson center on the use of visual, audio, oral and role-playing strategies to foster critical analysis. After completion students should be able to:. The Introductory Activity is used to introduce the idea of roles and role playing in life and contains two parts. If time is limited, one of the two activities may be eliminated.

The Learning Activities number two and revolve around critical responses to two video clips from Shakespeare Uncovered. This clip shows Viola assuming a disguise as a young man named Cesario. Hotspur, however, refuses to let anything sway his confidence: even if they must die, they will die merrily. The -Douglas, recovering from the alarming news, claims to have no fear of death at all, and the men continue to plan their battle. Meanwhile, on the road near Coventry—in southeastern England, east of London—Falstaff and his men are marching west toward their rendezvous with Henry at Bridgnorth.

Falstaff sends Bardolph to buy some wine, and, while Bardolph is gone, Falstaff talks aloud about his methods for finding his unit of foot soldiers. Falstaff proves a very corrupt military captain, which is not surprising.

Young Shakespeare Nation, Henry IV, Part 1 Teacher Pack

Instead of using his power of impressment that is, the power to draft soldiers to draft the best fighters available into his division, he has instead targeted wealthy merchants and farmers who want to stay home. These individuals are willing to bribe Falstaff in order to get out of the service.

As a result, Falstaff has made a good deal of money for himself, but his troops consist only of ragtag souls willing to let themselves be hired as soldiers: kleptomaniac house servants, youngest sons with no inheritance, and bankrupt laborers. This, of course, is just the prelude. The foreshadowing. The stage upon such things as the Ides of March are set.

Who knew that when Will Shook his Spear, he'd ever have so much to say? View all 6 comments. Food for powder, food for powder. In tone and atmosphere it is far more varied and naturalistic than its predecessor, Richard II. There are those who see in Falstaff the spirit of carnival—the ecstatic embrace of all the pleasures of life and the total rejection of all the hypocrisies of society. Others see Falstaff as a corrupter and a lout—a lazy and selfish fool. For my part I vacillate between these two attitudes. Still, I cannot help thinking that, if the Falstaffian attitude were embraced too widely, society itself would be impossible.

Some social restraint on our pleasure-loving instincts is necessary if we are not to end up fat drunken thieves. On the other hand, a generous dose of the Falstaffian attitude can be a great antidote to the self-righteous nonsense that leads us into war. In any case, Falstaff is not the only great character in this play. Hotspur is a mass of furious energy, an electrifying presence every time he is on stage.

Prince Hal, though less charismatic, is more complex. From the start, he already has an ambivalent relationship with Falstaff, a kind of icy affection or warm disregard. Indeed, Hal holds everyone at a distance, and one senses a skeptical intelligence that is wary of committing until the circumstances are just right. His actions seem far too deliberate, his timing too perfect.

Was he hoping to learn something by keeping company with Falstaff and his lot? View 1 comment. The second play about The Wars of the Roses and so massive in history, good ol' Will had to make two parts about this particular king! Since then, he has not had a quiet reign. There are still those who want Richard back funny, considering how many supported Henry because they were unsatisfied with Richard's way of doing things. How did kings usually solve such a problem?

Right, with a crusade, what else?! But he face The second play about The Wars of the Roses and so massive in history, good ol' Will had to make two parts about this particular king! But he faces such problems with Wales and Scotland that he can't go on the merry road-and-killing-trip. There is lots of intrigue from influential families such as the Percys and Henry's own son is giving him a headache or two as well since scandalous behaviour makes people question the worthiness to the throne.

The most charismatic person here definitely is Falstaff - as fat and drunk and corrupt as the old bloke may have been. That charisma is not just thrown at the audience but also at Henry's son. But soon, there is an outlet for all the pressure boiling up because the intrigues against King Henry IV result in a battle at Shrewsbury. Opposite the king's forces is one of the Percys, called "Hotspur" of all things one has to love the nicknames of the time. Funnily enough literally because they are comic relief in my opinion , completing the trio is King Henry's son and his friends yes, including the fat and drunk Falstaff who is no longer charismatic in my opinion, but acts most shamefully.

I must say, I didn't like Hal Henry's son very much. He was vile, thought himself oh-so-much-better, and made fun of his companions especially Falstaff in the worst ways. However, he himself informs the audience that this time will be over soon and that he will proof himself worthy. Had I not known what king he was to become, I would have considered this announcement the greatest joke in the play. Nevertheless, the aforementioned battle at Shrewsbury gives Hal his chance after he somehow gets his father to give him command and he does proof himself worthy indeed.

There is the inevitable climax in form of single combat between Hal and Hotspur and it was thrilling. In the end, even the dishonourable Falstaff wants to make amends for his behaviour and vows to change his ways. Thus, it can be said that apart from the overall theme of the Wars of the Roses, this play is also about sinful youths growing up to become men of honour. It definitely is the groundwork not only for part 2 but also for the next play about Henry V. I liked this play much better than the one about Richard II. Maybe I, too, fell for the comic relief and was blinded by fools becoming heroes.

View all 25 comments. Taught this play many times in the 60's and 70's, when it was often the one Shakespeare play in a college Intro to Lit class: great play, but heavily male. After my study with two prominent women Shakespeareans separate post-docs at Harvard and Breadloaf I moved, for the sake of my largely female community college students, to stronger women characters in the comedies and, say, Measure for Measure. But I still offhandedly quote from 1H4, say "If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries…"Falst Taught this play many times in the 60's and 70's, when it was often the one Shakespeare play in a college Intro to Lit class: great play, but heavily male.

But I still offhandedly quote from 1H4, say "If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries…"Falstaff to Hal who's caught him running away. I emphasized students aloudread for Tone of Voice, essential for lit, and especially for drama. This play teaches tone really well: Falstaff insults the Hostess, by calling her "You woman! Because of Falstaff's tone. Forgive I quote from memory here, last taught it two decades ago. Shakespeare shows his invention what we now call creativity, a different concept every time Falstaff speaks.

For instance, Hal insults Fallstaff's overweight with common criticism more useful to oversized Americans now--"this bed-presser, this huge hill of flesh"--while Falstaff thinks up great anti-jogger insults, "you starveling, you eelskin, you dried neat's tongue, you bull's pizzle…you sheath, you bow case, you vile standing tuck…. Oh, for breath to utter what is like thee! Next Falstaff play-acts "in King Cambyses vein" playing Hal's father the King, saying about the Hostess, "For tears do stop the floodgates of her eyes..

I also don't have it in me to go full snark on you, so let me just sum up this wonderful mess of a play: I never thought I would enjoy like I only know Targaryen. So much roasting, so many witty one-liners, all of the likeable characters who make stupid ass choices but you wouldn't expect anything less because it's fucking Shakespeare. Honestly, the biggest mood in this entire ass play is Prince Hal being a huge disappointment to his father on purpose.

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His reasoning behind his lowly ways literally is the fact that he thinks that he can impress his father better if the latter has the worst opinion of his character I mean, he isn't wrong I still don't know if Hal really had to go all out hanging around with thieves and whores but go off, I guess, we all had some rough days in our teenage years. We all know, Roman culture is stabbing yourself just to prove a point, so I think Hal's take on life is actually quite reasonable.

It helped me a lot in my comprehension that this play was so foreseeable as I had enough on my hands with keeping all of those names apart why is literally every male named Henry or Richard???


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I could cry. The way he tried to bullshit himself through this war by basically dropping dead every five seconds without fighting at all, and then later claiming all the biggest wins for himself was so fucking relatable, my most used annotation was: ME. I was rooting so much for Hal to finally prove his father wrong and make him proud in the end, whilst also feeling for Harry and his struggles to make a name for himself.

Shakespeare really did an amazing job at fleshing out all of these characters in a very short amount of time. Henry IV, Part 1 is definitely a play to remember and I cannot wait to finally finish its second part. Nov 20, Neil Walker rated it it was amazing. It may not be immediately obvious to people, when reading something like Drug Gang, but William Shakespeare has been a major and important influence on my writing. As an author, I have taken on board a lot of lessons from Shakespeare in terms of structure, story and character arcs.

Henry IV, Part 1 has always been my favourite work of Shakespeare. Primarily, this is because of the gradual transformation that Prince Hal goes through. Also, Falstaff is an amazing character, providing plenty of comi It may not be immediately obvious to people, when reading something like Drug Gang, but William Shakespeare has been a major and important influence on my writing.

Also, Falstaff is an amazing character, providing plenty of comic relief. The play manages to perfectly combine comedic elements, drama and an amazing story of a personal journey from wild and chaotic tearaway to triumphant hero. Apr 21, Becky rated it it was amazing Shelves: classics , theater. An absolutely brilliant and breathtaking work that is the perfect marriage of poetry, history, and wisdom. Falstaff may be one of the greatest creations of all literature, he is an astounding mix of hilarious wit, well-timed self-deprecation or should we instead say, full of valour in discretion?

From what we really know about kni An absolutely brilliant and breathtaking work that is the perfect marriage of poetry, history, and wisdom. You cannot help but love the tavern scenes, where Hal lets forth one of the more poignant soliloquies about the sun and informs us that this is all part of his plan- a plan that will briefly allow him to breathe free away from court where he will be immured for the rest of his life, and will also let him come to know the true stock of his kingdom. Even the basest man clings to some sort of honor, and what does Falstaff say honor is? Nothing but air.

You know why I really like Hal? He is much like Hector of Troy, he is confined by his duty to his family and country, he craves freedom but does what he must, and Hotspur is much like Achilles…and really, Achilles is the arrogant ass that always deserved to die. I should note that I read along after I watched the Hollow Crown series. Marvellous acting, truly wonderful A prince gone wild 22 February Thank God for Youtube. As I have said before reading a Shakespearian play that I have not seen on either stage or screen can be a difficult task at best.

In fact reading any play that I have not seen on stage or screen can be difficult, since they are generally not meant to be read but performed. The printed plays seem to supplement the performances rather than to take their place, so when I came to read this play I searched Youtube and discovered that the BBC A prince gone wild 22 February Thank God for Youtube. The printed plays seem to supplement the performances rather than to take their place, so when I came to read this play I searched Youtube and discovered that the BBC versions of the history plays are available for viewing, so once I finished this play I ended up watching it and I must say that it really added to my appreciation of the play.

Remember, during this period of English history England was in the middle of the Hundred Years War with France, and historians consider Henry and Richard to be weak kings during their reigns the war in France was not persued. However, England controlled a lot of French land at this time and keeping the peace in this land was difficult at best. At the beginning of the play Henry calls off an pilgrimage to the Holy Land a crusade to deal with some rebellions in Scotland and Wales and I suspect that he never got to go on that pilgrimage.

The problem wasn't that Henry had usurped the throne though his own inner guilt did have something to say in regards to this but that he had to deal with rebellions in Scotland and Wales. His first decision ends up alienating his former friends because he decides not to seek the release of another Englishman namely because he had formed a marriage pact with Owen Gwendoler more on him in a bit. As such these former friends end up rebelling against his rule and going over to his enemies.

There are also family problems as well because his son, Henry who is to become Henry V has fallen in with the tavern crowd the Boars Head Tavern at Eastcheap which, unfortunately, is no longer there, though I do plan on going to Eastcheap when I am in London. I am not sure where Henry's castle is supposed to be, but if we know London, we know that Eastcheap is quite close to the Tower of London in those days it wasn't a prison. The tavern crowd is run by the infamous Falstaff, one of the characters that seems to have obtained a legendary status in English Literature.

While the plays in which he appears are not remembered, the character is. Falstaff is the fat, loud, cowardly, oaf that forms the comic relief of many a book and film as well as this play however he has a very important role here. While Owen Glendower has taken Henry's lords from him, Falstaff has taken is son, therefore Henry faces problems both in his position as a king and a rule as a father.

The robbery scene is very important as, while it seems to be only a minor part at the beginning, it has a very significant impact. Robbery, particularly armed robbery, is a very serious offence, and while today you may only land up in gaol though I would not call that a particularly light sentence, especially since it can stain your character for life in those days you would be executed. Basically the only reason Henry gets away with it is because he is the Prince of Wales.

Even then there is a very serious father and son talk when he admits to his participation in the robbery and it also appears that he does not implicate Falstaff, who would have been executed for the deed. It begins with riotous merry making with Falstaff as the central figure, and ends with the sheriff coming in asking questions about the robbery. While Hal manages to keep the Sheriff off of Falstaff's back and while the pickpocketing incident leads to a rather interesting result, with Falstaff claiming that bonds were stolen, only to realise that everybody knows they were simply records of what he owes Hal ends up confessing to his father, and his father's act of mercy has Hal turn around and become the Prince of Wales.

In the end he is on the battlefield, rebuking Falstaff for his tomfoolery, and becoming the hero by slaying Hotspur in single combat. Owen Glendower was a Welsh rebel who was at war with the English during this period. I actually saw a documentary on Glendower and their suggestion was that it was during this time that Wales was transformed from being a wild and savage place to becoming that quaint place that we all associate with Wales today. It is similar to Scotland, with the place going from the wild and savage land of Macbeth and the Highlander, to the bagpipe playing centre of learning that produced the likes of Adam Smith.

He his made to appear as a sorcerer in league with demonic forces, and that his victories against the English are not due to his skill as an insurgent but due to his dabbling in the occult. He only appears in a couple of scenes in the play, yet he the focus the part of the play that is not dominated by Falstaff. Where Falstaff has stolen the King's son, Gwendower has stolen the King's knights. However, in the same way that Henry brings order back to his family, he brings order back into the kingdom during the Battle of Shrewsberry, after which the play suddenly ends obviously in anticipation for part 2.

View all 9 comments. Honestly I was a little worried Shakespeare's historical plays would be boring, but they most certainly are not. Mar 27, Zachary F. Glendower: I can call the spirits from the vasty deep. Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man; But will they come when you do call for them? So far, working my way through Will's plays chronologically has been about as frustrating as it has been illuminating.

With 1 Glendower: I can call the spirits from the vasty deep. With 15 of 38 plays down, my average rating has hovered around three stars, and only the assurance of eventual greatness has carried me through a slew of notorious clunkers like King John , Titus Andronicus , and the Henry VI trilogy. But all that only makes it more rewarding when I finally do catch a glimpse of real brilliance—and lucky for me, 1 Henry IV provides more than a mere glimpse.

Truth be told, most of the history plays live up to their reputations as dull and tedious affairs, at least next to the much flashier comedies and tragedies; but with 1 Henry IV Shakespeare finally figures out the genre's true strength: its capacity to put aside the rigid tropes of both tragedy and comedy, and to find a satisfying—and arguably more lifelike—balance between the two. This sort of genre-busting seems to have been an ongoing fascination for WS, if his problem plays are any indication.

The play is split pretty much evenly between the low, dirty humor of John Falstaff and his tavern-going friends their dialogue is rendered mostly in prose and the more elevated, aristocratic drama which unfolds between the eponymous king and his new rival, Henry "Hotspur" Percy they do all their talking in classic Shakespearean verse.

The two sections are linked together by Hal, the clever but lazy prince who—understandably enough, I think—would rather spend his youth getting drunk and playing pranks on Falstaff than hanging out at the palace conducting himself as a king-in-training. For the first couple of acts these two tableaux might as well take place in separate worlds, but as Hotspur and King Henry gear up for civil war the comedy and tragedy start bleeding together, till finally even Hal and pals have little choice but to get their shit together.

The effect is a little like those times in real life when something big and momentous happens without warning—a death in the family or a natural disaster or a shocking election—and suddenly going about your business like you always have isn't an option; the actual genre of your life , so to speak, changes. It's not really surprising when people start dropping dead around, say, Othello, because that's just the universe Othello exists in; it's more startling—and in a way, more sobering—when it happens to the comic relief. But all that high-minded stuff aside, this is also just a really good play.

The characters and relationships are well-rendered, the dialogue is topnotch, the core conflict is compelling and resonant. Henry IV follows pretty much directly on Richard II , which means if you've already read that one you've got a lot of helpful context for the events here; and since there are still two more plays in the series after this, Will is under less pressure to cram the whole saga into just five acts.

The thing breathes, is what I'm saying. Still, if 1 Henry IV doesn't quite reach the heights of a Hamlet or a Macbeth , it's only because that's not where Shakespeare is aiming. It feels like he's letting himself have fun here—the absurdly disproportionate amount of stagetime he grants to Falstaff seems proof enough of that—and with a good writer a sense of fun is an infectious thing. When I finished this play I felt reinvigorated, with a renewed excitement for all the Shakespearean treasures still to come. That seems like a more-than-good-enough endorsement to me.

See my review of Henry IV Part 2 here. This must be one of Shakespeare's best historical dramas, although there's a lot that's invented for dramatic effect; the Bard can never be taken as very historically correct, for he's first and foremost a playwright. The fairly simple plotline following the major points of the reign of the first Lancastrian king is enlivened by the inclusion of what should be Will's most comical character, Sir John Falstaff, bon vivant par excellence, who often steals stage from Prince Hal with his antics, rogu This must be one of Shakespeare's best historical dramas, although there's a lot that's invented for dramatic effect; the Bard can never be taken as very historically correct, for he's first and foremost a playwright.

The fairly simple plotline following the major points of the reign of the first Lancastrian king is enlivened by the inclusion of what should be Will's most comical character, Sir John Falstaff, bon vivant par excellence, who often steals stage from Prince Hal with his antics, rogue witticisms, and rascally way of life.

I also liked the "Harry to Harry" point-and-counterpoint type of parallel narration for Henry Percy "Hotspur" and Henry of Monmouth "Hal" , which allowed Shakespeare to offer a comparative storyline for two young men with so much talent for warfare and leading men who, nonetheless, are underestimated and often chided by their fathers, the Earl of Northumberland and Henry IV respectively, and other elders of varied competence and vanity for two large flaws that colour the public perception of them: Hotspur has the shortest ever fuse in England, and his hot-headedness lands him in serious trouble as well as makes him vulnerable to manipulation by cunning older relatives, which culminates in a disastrous rebellion; and Hal is a hopeless carouser, whoremonger and reveller that's adding more gray hairs to his father's head with his licentious lifestyle and the bad company he keeps.

One of these young men will realise in time he needs to change course if he wants to walk far in life, but the other's path will end at a battlefield by Shrewsbury as a consequence. This would be the tragedy portion of the play, but even so it doesn't lack humour, with Falstaff's "cowardly lion" battle exploits that are worth a smile or two. I would have objected to calling this Henry IV , though! I'd suspect Shakespeare doesn't like Bolingbroke a great deal, because even in Richard II , where he ironically had a larger role than in this play named after him, he seemed to me slightly more sympathetic to the deposed king than to the then Duke of Lancaster.

Likewise, in this play, he's more enamoured of Prince Harry what's it with scandalous English princes called Harry?

Henry IV Part I

Hey, that sounds much cooler! Apr 22, Dave Cullen rated it it was amazing. I love this play, and this edition. It's captivating and insightful, and I'm reading right after finishing "The Plantagenets," which I also recommend, and which teed it up nicely. One problem with reading the history of the English kings is their stories tend to blur together after while. I think I have this set of Henry's etched in my brain for another 20, too. The explanatory notes were very helpful, and I would have been very happy with this edition.

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But I compared this with Arden reviewed here line by and Arden had far more historical information and insightful notes on the wordplay eg, biblical sources he was playing off. Also, the Oxford actually overdid it explaining some phrases I found obvious. Also, get historical info on all the major characters. This appears to be the best out there. A bargain. If money is really tight, I highly recommend the "Oxford School Series," and note that's different than just "Oxford," which is also out there. Racing through it, on my scale.

I could do without Falstaff, but loving Hal and Hotspur and the other rebels and even the king sometimes. Sooooo good. Oct 18, Cindy Rollins rated it it was amazing Shelves: shakespeare , audio , morningtime , family-read-alouds , reread , , shakespeareaudio. Having just watched The Hollow Crown, this play was much easier to listen to.


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  4. The audio alone can be quite confusing, but a familiarity with the play helps.